Sophia Smith

Overview:

Dr. Sophia Smith is an Associate Professor at the Duke School of Nursing and earned her PhD and MSW degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work. Her research explores ways to improve the quality of cancer care including post-treatment survivorship and palliative care with a primary focus on leveraging technology in delivering behavioral health interventions to the community. She is leading efforts to integrate clinical cancer care and research as a means to build the body of scientific evidence that forms the foundation of evidence-based practice through her leadership as Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW) Research Director and membership on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Survivorship Guidelines Panel and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Survivorship Committee. Dr. Smith’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, NCCN, and Pfizer Grants for Independent Learning and Change.

Positions:

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.S.W. 2001

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2007

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

Advanced symptom burden and quality of life in multiple myeloma patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Symptom Burden and Quality of Life in Multiple Myeloma Patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Pillars4Life: An Online Self-Management Curriculum for Cancer Survivors

Administered By
School of Nursing
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Nonspecialty Nurse Education: Evaluation of the Oncology Intensives Initiative, an Oncology Curriculum to Improve Patient Care

BACKGROUND:A community hospital combined its medical and surgical patients with cancer on one unit, which resulted in nurses not trained in oncology caring for this patient population. OBJECTIVES:The Oncology Intensives Initiative (ONCii) involved the (a) design and implementation of a daylong didactic boot camp class and a four-hour simulation session and (b) the examination of nurses' worries, attitudes, self-efficacy, and perception of interdisciplinary teamwork. METHODS:A two-group, pre-/post-test design was implemented. Group 1 consisted of nurses who attended the didactic boot camp classes alone, whereas group 2 was comprised of nurses who attended the didactic boot camp classes and the simulation sessions. FINDINGS:Results of data analysis showed a decrease in worries and an increase in positive attitudes toward chemotherapy administration in both groups, as well as an increase in self-efficacy among members of group 2.
Authors
Bagley, KA; Dunn, SE; Chuang, EY; Dorr, VJ; Thompson, JA; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
Bagley, Kimberly A., et al. “Nonspecialty Nurse Education: Evaluation of the Oncology Intensives Initiative, an Oncology Curriculum to Improve Patient Care.” Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, vol. 22, no. 2, Apr. 2018, pp. E44–51. Epmc, doi:10.1188/18.cjon.e44-e51.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1307812
PMID
29547596
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
E44
End Page
E51
DOI
10.1188/18.cjon.e44-e51

Evaluation of Pillars4life: a virtual coping skills program for cancer survivors.

OBJECTIVE: Pillars4Life is an educational program that teaches coping skills to cancer patients in a virtual group setting; it was recently implemented at 17 hospitals across the USA. The cost-effective, scalable, and assessable Pillars4Life curriculum targets psychosocial resources (e.g., self-efficacy and coping skills) as a means to reduce symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress) and enhance quality of life. METHODS: Cancer patients were recruited from hospitals that received the LIVESTRONG Community Impact Project Award to enroll in a pilot study of Pillars4Life. Consenting participants met with a certified instructor weekly for 10 weeks in a virtual environment; the manualized intervention trained participants in personal coping skills. Longitudinal assessments over 6 months were assessed using validated instruments to determine changes in Pillars4Life targeted resources and outcomes. Multiple linear regression models examined the relationship between changes in targeted resources and changes in outcome from baseline to 3 months post-intervention. RESULTS: Participants (n = 130) had the following characteristics: mean age of 56 ± 11 years, 87% women, 11% non-Caucasian, and 77% with college degree. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, mean scores improved on all key outcome measures such as depression (Patient Health Questionnaire), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder), posttraumatic stress (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue), and well-being (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General) from baseline (all p < 0.01); results were most pronounced among participants who reported ≥4/10 on the Distress Thermometer at baseline (all p < 0.001). Changes in each targeted resource were associated with 3-month improvements in at least one outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Participation in the Pillars4Life program was associated with statistically and clinically significant improvements in scores on pre-specified outcomes and targeted resources.
Authors
Smith, SK; O'Donnell, JD; Abernethy, AP; MacDermott, K; Staley, T; Samsa, GP
MLA Citation
Smith, Sophia K., et al. “Evaluation of Pillars4life: a virtual coping skills program for cancer survivors..” Psychooncology, vol. 24, no. 11, Nov. 2015, pp. 1407–15. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/pon.3750.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1057131
PMID
25644773
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psychooncology
Volume
24
Published Date
Start Page
1407
End Page
1415
DOI
10.1002/pon.3750

Quality of life among long-term survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a follow-up study.

Little is known about change in quality of life (QOL) among long-term cancer survivors. We examined change over time in QOL among long-term survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and identified demographic, clinical, and psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes.Surveys were mailed to 682 lymphoma survivors who participated in a study 5 years earlier, when on average they were 10.4 years postdiagnosis. Standardized measures of QOL, perceptions of the impact of cancer, symptoms, medical history, and demographic variables were reported at both time points and examined using linear regression modeling to identify predictors of QOL over time.A total of 566 individuals participated (83% response rate) who were a mean of 15.3 years postdiagnosis; 52% were women, and 87% were white. One third of participants (32%) reported persistently high or improved QOL, yet a notable proportion (42%) reported persistently low or worsening QOL since the earlier survey. Participants who received only biologic systemic therapy reported improvement in physical health despite the passage of time. Older age, more comorbidity, and more or increasing negative and decreasing positive perceptions of cancer's impact were independent predictors of poor QOL. Lymphoma symptom burden, less social support, and having received a transplantation were related to negative perceptions of cancer's impact.Moderate to severe symptom burden, limited social support, or having received a transplantation should alert the clinician to potential need for supportive services. Perceptions of cancer's impact are associated with QOL cross-sectionally and longitudinally; modifying these perceptions may thus provide a strategy for improving QOL.
Authors
Smith, SK; Mayer, DK; Zimmerman, S; Williams, CS; Benecha, H; Ganz, PA; Edwards, LJ; Abernethy, AP
MLA Citation
Smith, Sophia K., et al. “Quality of life among long-term survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a follow-up study..” Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, vol. 31, no. 2, Jan. 2013, pp. 272–79. Epmc, doi:10.1200/JCO.2011.40.6249.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub747306
PMID
23213093
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
31
Published Date
Start Page
272
End Page
279
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2011.40.6249

The Rules of Engagement: CTTI Recommendations for Successful Collaborations Between Sponsors and Patient Groups Around Clinical Trials.

OBJECTIVE:To identify the elements necessary for successful collaboration between patient groups and academic and industry sponsors of clinical trials, in order to develop recommendations for best practices for effective patient group engagement. METHODS:In-depth interviews, informed by a previously reported survey, were conducted to identify the fundamentals of successful patient group engagement. Thirty-two respondents from 3 sectors participated: patient groups, academic researchers, and industry. The findings were presented to a multistakeholder group of experts in January 2015. The expert group came to consensus on a set of actionable recommendations for best practices for patient groups and research sponsors. RESULTS:Interview respondents acknowledged that not all patient groups are created equal in terms of what they can contribute to a clinical trial. The most important elements for effective patient group engagement include establishing meaningful partnerships, demonstrating mutual benefits, and collaborating as partners from the planning stage forward. Although there is a growing appreciation by sponsors about the benefits of patient group engagement, there remains some resistance and some uncertainty about how best to engage. Barriers include mismatched expectations and a perception that patient groups lack scientific sophistication and that "wishful thinking" may cloud their recommendations. CONCLUSIONS:Patient groups are developing diverse skillsets and acquiring assets to leverage in order to become collaborators with industry and academia on clinical trials. Growing numbers of research sponsors across the clinical trials enterprise are recognizing the benefits of continuous and meaningful patient group engagement, but there are still mindsets to change, and stakeholders need further guidance on operationalizing a new model of clinical trial conduct.
Authors
Bloom, D; Beetsch, J; Harker, M; Hesterlee, S; Moreira, P; Patrick-Lake, B; Selig, W; Sherman, J; Smith, SK; Valentine, JE; Roberts, JN
MLA Citation
Bloom, Diane, et al. “The Rules of Engagement: CTTI Recommendations for Successful Collaborations Between Sponsors and Patient Groups Around Clinical Trials..” Therapeutic Innovation & Regulatory Science, vol. 52, no. 2, Mar. 2018, pp. 206–13. Epmc, doi:10.1177/2168479017720247.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1305145
PMID
29714514
Source
epmc
Published In
Therapeutic Innovation and Regulatory Science
Volume
52
Published Date
Start Page
206
End Page
213
DOI
10.1177/2168479017720247

Fatigue in long-term non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

Authors
Hudson, KE; Benecha, HK; Houck, KL; LeBlanc, TW; Abernethy, AP; Zimmerman, S; Ganz, PA; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
Hudson, Kathryn Elizabeth, et al. “Fatigue in long-term non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 33, no. 29_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2015, pp. 239–239. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2015.33.29_suppl.239.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1149133
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
33
Published Date
Start Page
239
End Page
239
DOI
10.1200/jco.2015.33.29_suppl.239

Research Areas:

Cancer
Cancer Survivors
Cancer--Patients
Palliative Care
Palliative treatment
Social Work
Technology--Information services
Telemedicine