Hope Uronis

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2000

State University of New York at Buffalo

Medical Resident, Medicine

Duke University

Fellow in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Duke University

Chief Medical Resident -Duke Hospital, Medicine

Duke University

Fellow in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Duke University

Grants:

MK 3475 - PN811

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Randomized multicenter double blind Phase III study of Nivolumab or placebo in subjects with resected esophageal junction cancer.

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Multicenter randomized open label study in patients with esophageal cancer refractory or intorlerant to combination therapy with fluoropyrimidine

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1b/2 open label dose escalation study of Margetuximab incombination with Pembrolizumab in patients with relapsed refrectory advanced HER2 + Gastroesophageal junction or gastric cancer.

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Key LARGO: PII

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Novel small-molecule RORc agonist immuno-oncology agent LYC-55716: Safety and efficacy in a phase IIA open-label, multicenter trial

Authors
Wang, J; Liu, SV; Uronis, HE; Wu, C; Mahalingam, D; Spira, A; Carter, L; Hu, X; Weems, G; Wilkins, HJ; Duska, LR; Kelly, K
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1373384
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Oncology
Volume
29
Published Date

Phase Ib study of cabozantinib plus panitumumab in KRAS wild-type (WT) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

Authors
Strickler, JH; Rushing, CN; Uronis, HE; Morse, M; Blobe, GC; Zafar, Y; Hsu, SD; Arrowood, C; Haley, S; Dropkin, E; Niedzwiecki, D; Hurwitz, H
MLA Citation
Strickler, John H., et al. “Phase Ib study of cabozantinib plus panitumumab in KRAS wild-type (WT) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 34, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2016, pp. 3548–3548. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2016.34.15_suppl.3548.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1266558
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
3548
End Page
3548
DOI
10.1200/jco.2016.34.15_suppl.3548

The role of local excision in invasive adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater.

BACKGROUND: Ampulla of Vater carcinomas are rare malignancies that have been traditionally treated with radical surgical resection. Given the mortality associated with pancreaticoduodenectomy, some patients may benefit from local resection. A single-institution outcomes analysis was performed to define the role of local resection. METHODS: Patients undergoing local resection (ampullectomy) for ampullary carcinomas at Duke University between 1976 and 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Time-to-event analysis was conducted analyzing all patients undergoing surgery, with and without adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Overall survival (OS), local control (LC), metastases-free survival (MFS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were studied using Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: A total of 17 patients with invasive carcinoma underwent ampullectomy. The 3-and 5-year LC, MFS, DFS and OS rates were 36% and 24%, 68% and 54%, 31% and 21%, and 35% and 21%, respectively. Patients receiving adjuvant CRT did not appear to have improved outcomes compared with surgery alone, although this group tended to have poorer histological grade, more advanced tumor staging and involved surgical margins. CONCLUSIONS: Ampullectomy for invasive ampullary adenocarcinomas is a safe procedure but does not offer satisfactory long-term results, mostly due to high local failure rates. Adjuvant CRT therapy does not appear to offer increased local control or survival benefit following ampullectomy, although these results may suffer from selection bias and small sample size. Local resection should be limited to benign ampullary lesions or patients with very small, early tumors with favorable histologic features where radical resection is not feasible.
Authors
Zhong, J; Palta, M; Willett, CG; McCall, SJ; Bulusu, A; Tyler, DS; White, RR; Uronis, HE; Pappas, TN; Czito, BG
MLA Citation
Zhong, Jim, et al. “The role of local excision in invasive adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater..” J Gastrointest Oncol, vol. 4, no. 1, Mar. 2013, pp. 8–13. Pubmed, doi:10.3978/j.issn.2078-6891.2012.055.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub932720
PMID
23450004
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology
Volume
4
Published Date
Start Page
8
End Page
13
DOI
10.3978/j.issn.2078-6891.2012.055

A phase I study of erlotinib, bevacizumab, and external beam radiation therapy (RT) for patients with localized pancreatic carcinoma (PC).

281 Background: Localized PC is commonly managed with chemoradiotherapy, with or without surgical resection. The optimal combination of agents and doses is the subject of continued investigation. This phase I study examines the combination of two targeted radiosensitizing agents in combination with radiation therapy. METHODS: Eligible patients had resectable, borderline resectable or locally advanced adenocarcinoma. Patients received RT (1.8 Gy qd to 50.4 Gy) concurrent with bevacizumab and erlotinib. Dose-level 1 was bevacizumab 10 mg/kg weeks 1, 3 and 5 and erlotinib 100 mg daily, RT days only. Drug doses were escalated depending on encountered toxicity. The primary endpoint was determination of the maximally tolerated dose of this combination. Secondary endpoints included toxicity and activity assessment. RESULTS: Nine patients were enrolled in the phase I study. Maximal EUS/CT stage was T2N0 (n=1), T3N0 (n=1), T3N1 (n=2) or T4N0 (n=5). Of 3 patients in dose-level 1, two had radiographic stable disease (SD) and one partial response (PR). One pt underwent exploratory laparotomy and found to be unresectable, experiencing prolonged postoperative incisional healing. Three patients were then enrolled at dose-level 2 (bevacizumab 10 mg/kg, erlotinib 125 mg). Two had SD and one progressive disease (PD). One pt underwent exploratory laparotomy, aborted due to previously undetected hepatic metastases. Three patients were then enrolled at dose-level 3 (bevacizumab 10 mg/kg, erlotinib 150 mg). One pt had SD and two PR. One pt underwent distal pancreatectomy, experiencing postoperative pancreatic leak and abscess formation. All patients with elevated CA 19-9 at baseline had a decrease, with amedian decrease of 69% (R:13-93%). Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was not encountered at any dose-level. Primary non-dose limiting toxicities in all cohorts included NCI CTCAE v3.0 grade 1-2 nausea/vomiting, rash, diarrhea, fatigue, and anorexia. CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy utilizing erlotinib and bevacizumab is reasonably well-tolerated. The recommended phase II dose is bevacizumab 10 mg/kg weeks 1, 3, and 5 and erlotinib 150 mg RT days only. Phase II accrual is underway. [Table: see text].
Authors
Czito, BG; Willett, C; Kennedy-Newton, P; Tyler, DS; Hurwitz, H; Uronis, HE
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1163021
PMID
27985636
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
29
Published Date
Start Page
281

398 POSTER Phase I, pharmacokinetic (PK), dose-escalation study of EZN-2968, a novel hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1a) antagonist, administered weekly in patients (pts) with solid tumours

Authors
Lewis, N; Cohen, RB; Nishida, Y; Hurwitz, HI; Arrowwood, C; Uronis, HE; Gamza, F; Longley, C; Buchbinder, A; Figueroa, J
MLA Citation
Lewis, N., et al. “398 POSTER Phase I, pharmacokinetic (PK), dose-escalation study of EZN-2968, a novel hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1a) antagonist, administered weekly in patients (pts) with solid tumours.” European Journal of Cancer Supplements, vol. 6, no. 12, Elsevier BV, 2008, pp. 125–125. Crossref, doi:10.1016/s1359-6349(08)72332-2.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub886164
Source
crossref
Published In
European Journal of Cancer Supplements
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
125
End Page
125
DOI
10.1016/s1359-6349(08)72332-2

Research Areas:

Adenocarcinoma
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ampulla of Vater
Anastomotic Leak
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Aniline Compounds
Anoxia
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
Anus Neoplasms
Anxiety
Bevacizumab
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
Chemoradiotherapy
Chemoradiotherapy, Adjuvant
Colorectal Neoplasms
Combined Modality Therapy
Common Bile Duct Neoplasms
Depression
Esophagectomy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms
Humans
Hydroxamic Acids
Hypocalcemia
Hypokalemia
Hypoxia
Immunosuppressive Agents
Injections, Intravenous
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Language
Leukocytes, Mononuclear
Liver Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Lymphatic Irradiation
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Neoadjuvant Therapy
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Organoplatinum Compounds
Oxaliplatin
Pain Measurement
Palliative Care
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Patient Satisfaction
Photons
Platinum Compounds
Protein Kinase Inhibitors
Psychometrics
Pyrimidines
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Sirolimus
Socioeconomic Factors
Sulfonamides
Survival Rate
Thiazoles
Tumor Markers, Biological
Young Adult