Michael Harrison

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

Tulane University

residency, Medicine

Tulane University

Grants:

Bladder Cancer in Older Adults - Treatment and Outcomes

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

ATLAS: A Phase 2, Open-label Study of Rucaparib in Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

XL184-IST64

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3, Open-label, Randomized Study of Nivolumab Combined with Ipilimumab, or with Standard of Care Chemotherapy, versus Standard of Care Chemotherapy in Participants with Previously Untreated Unr

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase II Single Arm Study of Gemcitabine and Cisplatin plus Pembrolizumab as Neoadjuvant Therapy Prior to Radical Cystectomy in Patients with Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Vinflunine for the treatment of advanced or metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelial tract: an evidence-based review of safety, efficacy, and place in therapy.

Background: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the use of systemic vinflunine (VIN) in the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC) was performed to evaluate its efficacy based on current available clinical data. Methods: This review was prospectively registered at the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews, PROSPERO (registration CRD42016049294). Electronic databases including MEDLINE®, Embase®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science were searched through December 2016. We performed a meta-analysis of the published data. Primary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Numerous secondary clinical outcomes were analyzed including response and toxicity data. Results: We identified 382 publications, of which 35 met inclusion criteria for this review representing 29 unique studies. A total of 2,255 patients received VIN for the treatment of UC in the included studies. OS and PFS were analyzed in a pooled Kaplan-Meier analysis. Response data were available for 1,416 VIN-treated patients with random effects proportion of complete response in 1%, partial response in 18%, and overall response rate of 21%. Toxicity analysis revealed fatigue (40.1%), nausea (33.9%), constipation (34.1%), and alopecia (26.0%) as the most prevalent overall non-hematologic adverse events (AEs). Most prevalent grade 3-4 AEs were fatigue (10.2%), abdominal pain (8.2%), myalgias (2.5%), and nausea (2.3%). Most common hematologic AEs of all grades were anemia (56.6%), neutropenia (46.0%), thrombocytopenia (25.5%), and febrile neutropenia (6.6%). Grade 3-4 hematologic AEs had the following pooled rates: neutropenia, 24.6%; anemia, 10.2%; febrile neutropenia, 5.4%; and thrombocytopenia, 3.0%. Conclusion: VIN has been explored as a combination first-line treatment as well as a single-agent second-line, third-line, and maintenance therapy for advanced and metastatic UC. In first-line treatment of UC, either as a maintenance agent after cisplatin or as a primary combination therapy, VIN may be a promising alternative to current treatments. Further studies are needed to compare first-line combination VIN regimens to the current standard of care in order to assess long-term survival outcomes. Second- and third-line VIN monotherapy does provide a proven, although limited, survival benefit in platinum-refractory patients.
Authors
Brousell, SC; Fantony, JJ; Van Noord, MG; Harrison, MR; Inman, BA
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1302312
PMID
29416444
Source
pubmed
Published In
Core Evidence
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
12
DOI
10.2147/CE.S118670

Novel Androgen Receptor Signaling Inhibitors for Nonmetastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: The Light at the End of the Tunnel-or an Oncoming Train?

Authors
Harrison, MR; Ramalingam, S
MLA Citation
Harrison, M. R., and S. Ramalingam. “Novel Androgen Receptor Signaling Inhibitors for Nonmetastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: The Light at the End of the Tunnel-or an Oncoming Train?.” Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.), vol. 30, no. 4, Apr. 2016, pp. 345–47.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1165676
Source
scopus
Published In
Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
345
End Page
347

Evaluation of a novel c-MET based circulating tumor cell (CTC) biomarker in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) malignancies.

Authors
Zhang, T; Boominathan, R; Foulk, B; Connelly, MC; Rao, C; Kemeny, G; Strickler, JH; Abbruzzese, JL; Harrison, MR; George, DJ; Hurwitz, H; Garcia-Blanco, MA; Armstrong, AJ
MLA Citation
Zhang, Tian, et al. “Evaluation of a novel c-MET based circulating tumor cell (CTC) biomarker in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) malignancies..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 33, no. 15, AMER SOC CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 2015.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1085415
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
33
Published Date

Highlights in advanced prostate cancer from the 2013 American Urological Association Annual Meeting and the 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting: commentary.

MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1063728
PMID
25856023
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Advances in Hematology & Oncology : H&O
Volume
11 Suppl 14
Published Date
Start Page
16
End Page
22

Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characterization of tumor proliferation during acute sunitinib (SU) withdrawal.

Authors
Chao, BH; Harrison, MR; Kolesar, J; Vanderhoek, M; Perlman, S; Eickhoff, JC; Carmichael, L; Alberti, DB; Wilding, G; Jeraj, R; Liu, G
MLA Citation
Chao, B. H., et al. “Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characterization of tumor proliferation during acute sunitinib (SU) withdrawal..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 29, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), May 2011, pp. e13556–e13556. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2011.29.15_suppl.e13556.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1323752
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
29
Published Date
Start Page
e13556
End Page
e13556
DOI
10.1200/jco.2011.29.15_suppl.e13556