Daniel George

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor in Surgery

Surgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1992

Duke University

Medical Resident, Medicine

Johns Hopkins University

Fellow in Medical Oncology, Medicine

Johns Hopkins University

Grants:

Plasma Angiome and Serum Androgens as Predictors of Overall Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
Department of Defense
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Alternative splicing and epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in prostate tumors

Administered By
Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborating Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Disparities in the Use of Oral Anticancer Agents in Kidney Cancer

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Calithera CX-839-008

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase II open-label, Multicenter study of Apalutamide, Abiraterone Acetate and Prednisone in African American and Caucasian men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Precision Medicine Approaches When Prostate Cancer Akts Up.

Ipatasertib combined with abiraterone in PTEN-null prostate cancer improved progression-free survival in a randomized phase II study of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), providing clinical evidence of reciprocal activation between the Akt and androgen receptor (AR) pathways. These data revive the rationale for targeting PTEN loss in prostate cancer.See related article by de Bono et al., p. 928.
MLA Citation
Zhang, Tian, et al. “Precision Medicine Approaches When Prostate Cancer Akts Up..” Clin Cancer Res, vol. 25, no. 3, Feb. 2019, pp. 901–03. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-18-2491.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1350434
PMID
30206162
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
901
End Page
903
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-18-2491

Development of a novel therapeutic splice-switching oligonucleotide targeting race-related androgen receptor signaling and aggressive prostate cancer.

MLA Citation
LaCroix, Bonnie L., et al. “Development of a novel therapeutic splice-switching oligonucleotide targeting race-related androgen receptor signaling and aggressive prostate cancer..” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, vol. 27, no. 7, AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH, 2018, pp. 46–46.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1333213
Source
wos
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
46
End Page
46

Patterns of progression in bone and soft tissue following treatment with Ra-223 in metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

Authors
McNamara, MA; Ritz, M; Chin, B; Oldan, J; Anand, A; Oyekunle, T; Anand, M; Armstrong, AJ; George, DJ
MLA Citation
McNamara, Megan Ann, et al. “Patterns of progression in bone and soft tissue following treatment with Ra-223 in metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC)..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 36, no. 6_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2018, pp. 222–222. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2018.36.6_suppl.222.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1364813
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
36
Published Date
Start Page
222
End Page
222
DOI
10.1200/jco.2018.36.6_suppl.222

Prostate-specific antigen response in black and white patients treated with abiraterone acetate for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

PURPOSE: Evidence suggests differences in androgen receptor AR signaling between black (B) and white (W) patients with prostate cancer, but pivotal trials of abiraterone acetate (AA) for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) enrolled few black patients, a population with a higher mortality from prostate cancer. Our primary objective was to determine differences in response to AA between B and W patients. METHODS: We performed a retrospective case-control study of B vs. W patients treated with AA between May 1, 2008 and June 16, 2015 at Duke University Medical Center. Patients were identified (W control patients were matched 2:1 to B patients stratified based on previous docetaxel exposure) through pharmacy records and were eligible if treated with AA for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Patients with previous enzalutamide use were excluded. The primary objective was to compare the rate of≥90% prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decline from baseline between B vs. W patients. Secondary outcomes included comparing time on therapy, time to PSA progression, and overall survival among groups. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics among patients (n = 45 B, n = 90 W) were identified; these included Karnofsky performance status, PSA, Gleason score, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, hemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase, opiate use for pain, and metastatic sites. Baseline characteristics among groups were similar except for median hemoglobin (B = 11.4g/dl, W = 12.3g/dl). The proportion of B patients achieving a≥90% PSA level decline was 37.8% vs. 28.9% for W patients (P = 0.296). Statistically significant differences were found in the proportion of patients achieving a≥50% PSA level decline (B = 68.9%, W = 48.9% [P = 0.028]) and≥30% PSA level decline (B = 77.8%, W = 54.4% [P = 0.008]). Rates of primary abiraterone-refractory disease (PSA increase as best response) trended higher in W (31.1%) than in B (15.6%) patients (P = 0.052). Median treatment duration (B = 9.4 mo, W = 8.3 mo) did not differ (Wilcoxon P = 0.444). Median overall survival (B = 27.3 mo [95% CI: 13.9, not estimable], W = 24.8 mo [95% CI: 19, 31.6] [P = 0.669]) and median time to PSA progression (B = 11.0 mo [95% CI: 4.3, 18.0], W = 9.4 mo [95% CI: 6.2, 13.0] [P = 0.917]) did not differ. CONCLUSIONS: Black patients may have a higher PSA response to AA than white patients. An ongoing prospective clinical study (NCT01940276) is evaluating outcomes between black and white patients treated with AA.
Authors
Ramalingam, S; Humeniuk, MS; Hu, R; Rasmussen, J; Healy, P; Wu, Y; Harrison, MR; Armstrong, AJ; George, DJ; Zhang, T
MLA Citation
Ramalingam, Sundhar, et al. “Prostate-specific antigen response in black and white patients treated with abiraterone acetate for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer..” Urol Oncol, vol. 35, no. 6, June 2017, pp. 418–24. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.urolonc.2016.12.016.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1172375
PMID
28126272
Source
pubmed
Published In
Urol Oncol
Volume
35
Published Date
Start Page
418
End Page
424
DOI
10.1016/j.urolonc.2016.12.016

Novel immunotherapy approaches for metastatic urothelial and renal cell carcinoma.

The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and urothelial carcinoma (UC) remains a major challenge. Past research has implicated the immune system in tumor surveillance of both malignancies, leading to the application of immunotherapy agents for both cancers. Among them, the most promising agents are the checkpoint blockade drugs, such as antibodies targeting the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1), and PD-1 ligand (PD-L1). In normal physiology, these immune checkpoints act as inhibitory signals to fine-tune the duration and strength of immune reactions, which is pivotal for maintaining self-tolerance. However, tumor cells also utilize immune checkpoint pathways to evade anti-tumor immune response, leading to disease progression and metastasis. Thus, there has been intense preclinical and clinical effort focused on the application of checkpoint inhibitors in metastatic RCC and UC. To date, nivolumab (anti-PD-1) and atezolizumab (anti-PD-L1) have been approved for the treatment of metastatic RCC and UC, respectively. Despite these successes, challenges remain in how to further improve response rates to immunotherapy and how to select patients that will benefit from this approach. In this report, we review existing data and research on immunotherapy in metastatic RCC and UC.
Authors
Shao, Z; Wang, AZ; George, DJ; Zhang, T
MLA Citation
Shao, Zhiying, et al. “Novel immunotherapy approaches for metastatic urothelial and renal cell carcinoma..” Asian J Urol, vol. 3, no. 4, Oct. 2016, pp. 268–77. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ajur.2016.08.013.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1273985
PMID
29264195
Source
pubmed
Published In
Asian Journal of Urology
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
268
End Page
277
DOI
10.1016/j.ajur.2016.08.013